2016 Make-Up Artists & Hair Stylist Guild Awards

  1. 2016 Make-Up Artists & Hair Stylist Guild Awards

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

    MAKE-UP ARTISTS & HAIR STYLISTS GUILD 

    ANNOUNCE AWARDS SET FOR SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2016

    Timeline For Awards Announced


    LOS ANGELES, June 23, 2015 – The Make-Up Artists & Hair Stylists Guild (IATSE Local 706) Awards honoring outstanding achievements for make-up artists and hair stylists in motion pictures, television, commercials and live theater will take place on Saturday, February 20, 2016 it was announced today by IATSE Local 706 President Susan Cabral-Ebert. The location will be confirmed at a later date.

    The entry and voting timeline for the 2016 Make-Up Artists & Hair Stylists Guild Awards is:
    Submissions Open – Tuesday, October 13, 2015 
    Submissions Close – Friday, November 20, 2015 at 5:00PM (PT) 
    Voting for Nominations Begins – Monday, December 7, 2015 
    Voting for Nominations Close – Monday, January 11, 2016 at 5:00PM (PT) 
    Nominations Announced – Wednesday, January 13, 2016
    Final Ballot Voting Begins – Monday, January 18, 2016 
    Final Ballot Voting Close – Tuesday, February 16, 2016 at 5:00PM (PT) 
    Winners Announced at the Local 706 Make-Up Artists & Hair Stylists Guild Awards – Saturday, February 20, 2016 
    *Dates subject to change  

    Honorees for the Distinguished Artisan Award and the two Lifetime Achievement Awards honoring Make-Up Artists and Hair Stylists will be announced in the near future.


    ABOUT LOCAL 706:
    The Make-Up Artists & Hair Stylists Guild (IATSE, Local 706) was chartered in November 1937. Today, membership includes over 1,900 artisans in the entertainment industry worldwide. Local 706 members are make-up artists and hair stylists who have created the looks for Hollywood’s most memorable characters and stars of stage, screen, television and now the Internet. The wide-ranging domains of these artists include feature films and television, commercials; “live” network television, all types of theatrical productions and Disneyland theme parks. Local 706 Members have created notable characters competing for Academy Awards®, Primetime Emmys®, Daytime Entertainment Emmys®, Saturn Awards®, BAFTA Awards®, and many other honors for make-up and hair styling artistry including their own Hollywood Make-Up Artists & Hair Stylists Guild Awards. The Local 706 Guild publishes The Artisan, a glossy quarterly magazine, and provides panels, workshops and training both for members and others interested in the field to foster a spirit of innovation in the craft. For more information, visit local706.org or follow MUAHS on Facebook and Twitter (@Local706).

    MEDIA CONTACTS:
    Cheri Warner l Nicole Player
    Weissman/Markovitz Communications
    818/760.8995 
    cheri@publicity4all.com | nicole@publicity4all.com

    SPONSORSHIP/ADVERTISING CONTACT: 
    Jill Carrigan, IngleDodd Media
    310/773-7002
    local706@ingledodd.com

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  2. 2016 Make-Up Artists & Hair Stylist Guild Awards

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

    MAKE-UP ARTISTS & HAIR STYLISTS GUILD 

    ANNOUNCE AWARDS SET FOR SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2016

    Timeline For Awards Announced


    LOS ANGELES, June 23, 2015 – The Make-Up Artists & Hair Stylists Guild (IATSE Local 706) Awards honoring outstanding achievements for make-up artists and hair stylists in motion pictures, television, commercials and live theater will take place on Saturday, February 20, 2016 it was announced today by IATSE Local 706 President Susan Cabral-Ebert. The location will be confirmed at a later date.

    The entry and voting timeline for the 2016 Make-Up Artists & Hair Stylists Guild Awards is:
    Submissions Open – Tuesday, October 13, 2015 
    Submissions Close – Friday, November 20, 2015 at 5:00PM (PT) 
    Voting for Nominations Begins – Monday, December 7, 2015 
    Voting for Nominations Close – Monday, January 11, 2016 at 5:00PM (PT) 
    Nominations Announced – Wednesday, January 13, 2016
    Final Ballot Voting Begins – Monday, January 18, 2016 
    Final Ballot Voting Close – Tuesday, February 16, 2016 at 5:00PM (PT) 
    Winners Announced at the Local 706 Make-Up Artists & Hair Stylists Guild Awards – Saturday, February 20, 2016 
    *Dates subject to change  

    Honorees for the Distinguished Artisan Award and the two Lifetime Achievement Awards honoring Make-Up Artists and Hair Stylists will be announced in the near future.


    ABOUT LOCAL 706:
    The Make-Up Artists & Hair Stylists Guild (IATSE, Local 706) was chartered in November 1937. Today, membership includes over 1,900 artisans in the entertainment industry worldwide. Local 706 members are make-up artists and hair stylists who have created the looks for Hollywood’s most memorable characters and stars of stage, screen, television and now the Internet. The wide-ranging domains of these artists include feature films and television, commercials; “live” network television, all types of theatrical productions and Disneyland theme parks. Local 706 Members have created notable characters competing for Academy Awards®, Primetime Emmys®, Daytime Entertainment Emmys®, Saturn Awards®, BAFTA Awards®, and many other honors for make-up and hair styling artistry including their own Hollywood Make-Up Artists & Hair Stylists Guild Awards. The Local 706 Guild publishes The Artisan, a glossy quarterly magazine, and provides panels, workshops and training both for members and others interested in the field to foster a spirit of innovation in the craft. For more information, visit local706.org or follow MUAHS on Facebook and Twitter (@Local706).

    MEDIA CONTACTS:
    Cheri Warner l Nicole Player
    Weissman/Markovitz Communications
    818/760.8995 
    cheri@publicity4all.com | nicole@publicity4all.com

    SPONSORSHIP/ADVERTISING CONTACT: 
    Jill Carrigan, IngleDodd Media
    310/773-7002
    local706@ingledodd.com

    page5image824

  3. Henry Vilardo

    Henry Vilardo, Journeyman Make-up Artist/ Business Representative and Trustee of the
    Motion Picture Industry Health and Pension Plan (1923-2015)

    Born in Chicago, Henry Vilardo began his 706 apprenticeship at Warner Bros. Studios in 1944. He worked with some of the truly great actors of the time – James Dean, Paul Newman, Jack Lemmon, James Cagney, Doris Day and Sophia Loren and is credited with films The Days of Wine and Roses, A Summer Place, The Young Philadelphians and Boy on a Dolphin and many others. He began serving on the Executive Board in 1956 and became Business Representative for Local 706 in 1959. He was well respected as a contract negotiator and in order to represent the members better, Hank attended law school and achieved a Juris Doctorate to be in a position to do the best possible job. He dealt with exactly the same challenges that are faced in the union today. He attempted to rectify 32 years of “diminishing wage salary inequity” but unfortunately had no better fortune with that subject than make-up artists and hair stylists face today. The Business Representative of the Film Technicians Local 683 wrote in 1973, “It has been a gratifying experience to negotiate, arbitrate and conciliate numerous problems in the Motion Picture and Television Industries with Henry Vilardo. He has demonstrated his integrity and prowess as an extremely competent Labor Representative and one of the most skilled and aggressive negotiators in the Labor Movement. This is complemented by his keen insight and knowledge of the Motion Picture and Television Industries and his ability to communicate practical and reasonable solutions…Mr. Vilardo is well aware of the employees’ problems in the Motion Picture and Television Industries, as related to foreign production and American-interest “runaway” productions and it was my good fortune to serve with him on a Committee appearing in Washington, D.C. before our legislators. I was personally impressed with his ability in expressing the seriousness of Hollywood’s plight and his suggested solutions which are now being considered in legislative form before the 93rd Congressional Session in the House of Representatives.”

    In 1974 he was appointed by the International to Chair a three man Committee to draft language to present to the Producer’s Association and the United States Department of Labor regarding a Memorandum of Resolution coupled to the United States Presidential Executive Order for an Affirmative Action Program, in an attempt to secure more employment for the Hollywood production crews. His draft was accepted by the Producer’s Association unamended. In the private sector, President Lyndon Johnson’s Executive Order 11246 gave the Secretary of Labor authority to formulate rules requiring federal contractors to take “affirmative action” towards eliminating discrimination after 1965. At the same time, the Civil Rights Act was being enforced by the federal courts against discriminatory companies, unions, and other institutions. The Department of Labor worked with the construction industry to establish a series of region-wide “plans” for numerical hiring goals. Through those contractor commitments, the department also could indirectly pressure labor unions, who supplied the employees at job sites, to create more ethnically balanced work crews. It was during this time that women became make-up artists, men became hair stylists, and minorities broke the barriers into union membership for both crafts.

    Henry resigned as Business Representative for the Make-up Artists and Hair Stylists, Local 706 and retired from the Local in 1974. Soon after that he was appointed as Secretary of the Motion Picture Pension Plan Board of Directors, Member of the Administrative Committee, Finance Committee and Legal Committee of the Pension Plan. He was also instrumental in finding the building that now houses the MPIPHP on Ventura Boulevard. During that year’s negotiations he was appointed as Chairman of the Meal Periods Committee, and was selected by IATSE President Walsh to help draft language for the Grievance and Technological Change Clauses of the new contract.

    After his retirement, Henry Vilardo served as a Director for the Motion Picture Television Fund, and as a Trustee for the Motion Picture Industry Health and Pension Plan and continued in that capacity until the early 2000s.

    Henry E. Vilardo is survived by his spouse Stephanie Vilardo. He has two children, Jan De La Vega and Jon Vilardo by his former spouse Elaine. Local 706 was notified of Henry’s passing on June 10, 2015, but no information has been given to Local 706 regarding any memorial or burial information.

  4. Henry Vilardo

    Henry Vilardo, Journeyman Make-up Artist/ Business Representative and Trustee of the
    Motion Picture Industry Health and Pension Plan (1923-2015)

    Born in Chicago, Henry Vilardo began his 706 apprenticeship at Warner Bros. Studios in 1944. He worked with some of the truly great actors of the time – James Dean, Paul Newman, Jack Lemmon, James Cagney, Doris Day and Sophia Loren and is credited with films The Days of Wine and Roses, A Summer Place, The Young Philadelphians and Boy on a Dolphin and many others. He began serving on the Executive Board in 1956 and became Business Representative for Local 706 in 1959. He was well respected as a contract negotiator and in order to represent the members better, Hank attended law school and achieved a Juris Doctorate to be in a position to do the best possible job. He dealt with exactly the same challenges that are faced in the union today. He attempted to rectify 32 years of “diminishing wage salary inequity” but unfortunately had no better fortune with that subject than make-up artists and hair stylists face today. The Business Representative of the Film Technicians Local 683 wrote in 1973, “It has been a gratifying experience to negotiate, arbitrate and conciliate numerous problems in the Motion Picture and Television Industries with Henry Vilardo. He has demonstrated his integrity and prowess as an extremely competent Labor Representative and one of the most skilled and aggressive negotiators in the Labor Movement. This is complemented by his keen insight and knowledge of the Motion Picture and Television Industries and his ability to communicate practical and reasonable solutions…Mr. Vilardo is well aware of the employees’ problems in the Motion Picture and Television Industries, as related to foreign production and American-interest “runaway” productions and it was my good fortune to serve with him on a Committee appearing in Washington, D.C. before our legislators. I was personally impressed with his ability in expressing the seriousness of Hollywood’s plight and his suggested solutions which are now being considered in legislative form before the 93rd Congressional Session in the House of Representatives.”

    In 1974 he was appointed by the International to Chair a three man Committee to draft language to present to the Producer’s Association and the United States Department of Labor regarding a Memorandum of Resolution coupled to the United States Presidential Executive Order for an Affirmative Action Program, in an attempt to secure more employment for the Hollywood production crews. His draft was accepted by the Producer’s Association unamended. In the private sector, President Lyndon Johnson’s Executive Order 11246 gave the Secretary of Labor authority to formulate rules requiring federal contractors to take “affirmative action” towards eliminating discrimination after 1965. At the same time, the Civil Rights Act was being enforced by the federal courts against discriminatory companies, unions, and other institutions. The Department of Labor worked with the construction industry to establish a series of region-wide “plans” for numerical hiring goals. Through those contractor commitments, the department also could indirectly pressure labor unions, who supplied the employees at job sites, to create more ethnically balanced work crews. It was during this time that women became make-up artists, men became hair stylists, and minorities broke the barriers into union membership for both crafts.

    Henry resigned as Business Representative for the Make-up Artists and Hair Stylists, Local 706 and retired from the Local in 1974. Soon after that he was appointed as Secretary of the Motion Picture Pension Plan Board of Directors, Member of the Administrative Committee, Finance Committee and Legal Committee of the Pension Plan. He was also instrumental in finding the building that now houses the MPIPHP on Ventura Boulevard. During that year’s negotiations he was appointed as Chairman of the Meal Periods Committee, and was selected by IATSE President Walsh to help draft language for the Grievance and Technological Change Clauses of the new contract.

    After his retirement, Henry Vilardo served as a Director for the Motion Picture Television Fund, and as a Trustee for the Motion Picture Industry Health and Pension Plan and continued in that capacity until the early 2000s.

    Henry E. Vilardo is survived by his spouse Stephanie Vilardo. He has two children, Jan De La Vega and Jon Vilardo by his former spouse Elaine. Local 706 was notified of Henry’s passing on June 10, 2015, but no information has been given to Local 706 regarding any memorial or burial information.

  5. Call in Now

    Hi – Today is the national call in day to oppose the pending Trans Pacific Partnership Trade deal in Congress, also known as Fast Track.  Below is a link to Robert Reich’s 2 minute explanation of why it is so bad and attached is the call in information: 855-712-8441.  The number patches you through to the AFL-CIO hotline, enter your zip code and the recording has a few pointers of what to say and they connect you with your member of Congress.  Easy Activism – and critically important!  Please make the call.   

    Learn more about the issue from former Secretary of Labor, Robert Reich: //www.youtube.com/watch?v=3O_Sbbeqfdw

    page5image824

  6. Call in Now

    Hi – Today is the national call in day to oppose the pending Trans Pacific Partnership Trade deal in Congress, also known as Fast Track.  Below is a link to Robert Reich’s 2 minute explanation of why it is so bad and attached is the call in information: 855-712-8441.  The number patches you through to the AFL-CIO hotline, enter your zip code and the recording has a few pointers of what to say and they connect you with your member of Congress.  Easy Activism – and critically important!  Please make the call.   

    Learn more about the issue from former Secretary of Labor, Robert Reich: //www.youtube.com/watch?v=3O_Sbbeqfdw

    page5image824

  7. CFC tax credits

    First Eleven TV Projects Approved for California’s Newly Expanded Film & TV Tax Credit Program

    Download Press Release

    First Round of Projects Includes Four TV Series Relocating from Other States; Final Lottery Selections for Expiring Tax Credit Program Also Announced

    Hollywood, Calif. – June 2, 2015 – The California Film Commission today announced the list of 11 projects selected to receive tax credits under the first allocation of the state’s new Film and Television Tax Credit Program 2.0, which expands program funding from $100 million to $330 million annually.
    “The newly expanded California Film Tax Credit is encouraging new TV production in the state and is bringing several projects from other states,” said senior advisor to Governor Brown, Mike Rossi. “California remains the home of the stuff dreams are made of.”

    The program’s first application period, held May 11-17, was open only to television projects scheduled to begin production on or after July 1. A total of $55.2 million in credits was made available for new TV series, miniseries, movies of the week (MOWs) and pilots, along with $27.6 million for series relocating production to California from out-of-state. These allocations combine for a total of $82.8 million out of the first fiscal-year’s $230 million in funding (note $100 million in annual funding is allocated to the final year of the state’s expiring, first-generation tax credit program).

    The approved projects are categorized as follows:

    • New TV Series — 6 projects
    • Pilots — 1 project
    • Relocating TV Series — 4 projects

    Based on data provided with each application, the 11 approved projects will generate an estimated $544 million in direct in-state spending, including $216 million in wages for below-the-line crew members.
    “We are thrilled with the results from the program’s first application period,” said California Film Commission Executive Director Amy Lemisch. “California crews and support businesses will begin to feel the impact immediately as these first 11 projects begin pre-production. The number of projects planning to relocate to California confirms that our expanded incentive program is already working.”

    Lemisch points out that four TV series are set to relocate production to California from Louisiana, Georgia, Maryland and North Carolina.
    The 11 approved projects were selected based on their jobs ratio score, which ranks each project by wages to below-the-line workers, qualified spending (vendor payments, equipment, etc.) and other
    criteria. This new jobs ratio protocol for selecting projects replaces the prior lottery system employed by the state’s first-generation tax credit program.

    The 11 approved projects were among the 37 TV projects that applied during the new program’s first application period. The remaining projects with a jobs ratio score ranked in the top 200 percent of applicants have been placed on a waiting list.

    Another change under the newly-expanded program is eligibility to a wider range of TV project types, including new series for network, premium cable outlets, and internet distribution, as well as pilots.
    The new program also allocates tax credits in “buckets” for different production categories, including TV projects, relocating TV series, independent projects and non-independent films. This enables applicants to compete for credits directly against comparable projects.

    Wrapping-Up the State’s Expiring Tax Credit Program

    In addition to announcing the first round of projects selected for the newly-expanded program, the California Film Commission also announced the list of projects approved conditionally for the final round of state’s first-generation tax credit program, which held its final abbreviated lottery on April 1.

    The abbreviated lottery was open only to independent projects due to the program’s success in attracting and retaining television series. A total of 16 films were selected to receive credits reserved specifically for independent projects. The rest of the old program’s final $100 annual allocation will go to the 11 returning TV series accepted for an automatic allocation renewal.

    A total of 246 applications were received prior to the lottery held on April 1. Those not among the 16 selected provisionally to receive credits have been placed on the waiting list. As with past lotteries, the Film Commission expects many wait list projects to ultimately receive tax credits, as some approved projects withdraw due to scheduling delays and/or other production-related factors. When a project withdraws, its credits are reassigned to the project(s) next in line on the waiting list.

    Under both the old and new programs, the California Film Commission awards tax credits only after each selected project: 1) completes post-production, 2) verifies that in-state jobs were created, and 3) provides all required documentation, including audited cost reports.

    The next application period for the new tax credit program is scheduled for July 13-25, with a funding bucket of $48.3 million for feature films and $6.9 million for independent projects.

    More information about California’s newly-expanded Film and Television Tax Credit Program 2.0, including application procedures, eligibility and program guidelines, is available at //film.ca.gov/incentives.

    About California’s Film and Television Tax Credit Program 2.0

    On September 18, 2014, Governor Brown signed bipartisan legislation to more than triple the size of California’s film and television production incentive, from $100 million to $330 million annually. Aimed at retaining and attracting production jobs and economic activity across the state, the California Film and TV Tax Credit Program 2.0 also extends eligibility to include a range of project types (big-budget
    feature films, TV pilots and 1-hr TV series for any distribution outlet) that were excluded from the state’s first-generation tax credit program. Other key changes include replacing the prior lottery system with a “jobs ratio” ranking system that selects projects based on wages paid to below-the-line workers, qualified spending (vendor payments, equipment, etc.) and other criteria. In addition, “uplifts” are now available for projects that shoot outside the Los Angeles 30-mile zone or have qualified expenditures for visual effects or music scoring/track recording.

    About the California Film Commission

    The California Film Commission enhances California’s status as the leader in motion picture, television and commercial production. It supports productions of all sizes and budgets, and focuses on activities that stimulate and preserve production spending, jobs and tax revenues in California. Services include administration of the state’s Film & Television Tax Credit Program, permits for filming at state-owned facilities, an extensive digital location library, location assistance and a range of other production- related resources and assistance. More information is available at //www.film.ca.gov.

    Contact: Erik Deutsch, ExcelPR Group (for the California Film Commission) (323) 851-2455 direct / (310) 597-9245 cell / erikd@excelpr.com

  8. CFC tax credits

    First Eleven TV Projects Approved for California’s Newly Expanded Film & TV Tax Credit Program

    Download Press Release

    First Round of Projects Includes Four TV Series Relocating from Other States; Final Lottery Selections for Expiring Tax Credit Program Also Announced

    Hollywood, Calif. – June 2, 2015 – The California Film Commission today announced the list of 11 projects selected to receive tax credits under the first allocation of the state’s new Film and Television Tax Credit Program 2.0, which expands program funding from $100 million to $330 million annually.
    “The newly expanded California Film Tax Credit is encouraging new TV production in the state and is bringing several projects from other states,” said senior advisor to Governor Brown, Mike Rossi. “California remains the home of the stuff dreams are made of.”

    The program’s first application period, held May 11-17, was open only to television projects scheduled to begin production on or after July 1. A total of $55.2 million in credits was made available for new TV series, miniseries, movies of the week (MOWs) and pilots, along with $27.6 million for series relocating production to California from out-of-state. These allocations combine for a total of $82.8 million out of the first fiscal-year’s $230 million in funding (note $100 million in annual funding is allocated to the final year of the state’s expiring, first-generation tax credit program).

    The approved projects are categorized as follows:

    • New TV Series — 6 projects
    • Pilots — 1 project
    • Relocating TV Series — 4 projects

    Based on data provided with each application, the 11 approved projects will generate an estimated $544 million in direct in-state spending, including $216 million in wages for below-the-line crew members.
    “We are thrilled with the results from the program’s first application period,” said California Film Commission Executive Director Amy Lemisch. “California crews and support businesses will begin to feel the impact immediately as these first 11 projects begin pre-production. The number of projects planning to relocate to California confirms that our expanded incentive program is already working.”

    Lemisch points out that four TV series are set to relocate production to California from Louisiana, Georgia, Maryland and North Carolina.
    The 11 approved projects were selected based on their jobs ratio score, which ranks each project by wages to below-the-line workers, qualified spending (vendor payments, equipment, etc.) and other
    criteria. This new jobs ratio protocol for selecting projects replaces the prior lottery system employed by the state’s first-generation tax credit program.

    The 11 approved projects were among the 37 TV projects that applied during the new program’s first application period. The remaining projects with a jobs ratio score ranked in the top 200 percent of applicants have been placed on a waiting list.

    Another change under the newly-expanded program is eligibility to a wider range of TV project types, including new series for network, premium cable outlets, and internet distribution, as well as pilots.
    The new program also allocates tax credits in “buckets” for different production categories, including TV projects, relocating TV series, independent projects and non-independent films. This enables applicants to compete for credits directly against comparable projects.

    Wrapping-Up the State’s Expiring Tax Credit Program

    In addition to announcing the first round of projects selected for the newly-expanded program, the California Film Commission also announced the list of projects approved conditionally for the final round of state’s first-generation tax credit program, which held its final abbreviated lottery on April 1.

    The abbreviated lottery was open only to independent projects due to the program’s success in attracting and retaining television series. A total of 16 films were selected to receive credits reserved specifically for independent projects. The rest of the old program’s final $100 annual allocation will go to the 11 returning TV series accepted for an automatic allocation renewal.

    A total of 246 applications were received prior to the lottery held on April 1. Those not among the 16 selected provisionally to receive credits have been placed on the waiting list. As with past lotteries, the Film Commission expects many wait list projects to ultimately receive tax credits, as some approved projects withdraw due to scheduling delays and/or other production-related factors. When a project withdraws, its credits are reassigned to the project(s) next in line on the waiting list.

    Under both the old and new programs, the California Film Commission awards tax credits only after each selected project: 1) completes post-production, 2) verifies that in-state jobs were created, and 3) provides all required documentation, including audited cost reports.

    The next application period for the new tax credit program is scheduled for July 13-25, with a funding bucket of $48.3 million for feature films and $6.9 million for independent projects.

    More information about California’s newly-expanded Film and Television Tax Credit Program 2.0, including application procedures, eligibility and program guidelines, is available at //film.ca.gov/incentives.

    About California’s Film and Television Tax Credit Program 2.0

    On September 18, 2014, Governor Brown signed bipartisan legislation to more than triple the size of California’s film and television production incentive, from $100 million to $330 million annually. Aimed at retaining and attracting production jobs and economic activity across the state, the California Film and TV Tax Credit Program 2.0 also extends eligibility to include a range of project types (big-budget
    feature films, TV pilots and 1-hr TV series for any distribution outlet) that were excluded from the state’s first-generation tax credit program. Other key changes include replacing the prior lottery system with a “jobs ratio” ranking system that selects projects based on wages paid to below-the-line workers, qualified spending (vendor payments, equipment, etc.) and other criteria. In addition, “uplifts” are now available for projects that shoot outside the Los Angeles 30-mile zone or have qualified expenditures for visual effects or music scoring/track recording.

    About the California Film Commission

    The California Film Commission enhances California’s status as the leader in motion picture, television and commercial production. It supports productions of all sizes and budgets, and focuses on activities that stimulate and preserve production spending, jobs and tax revenues in California. Services include administration of the state’s Film & Television Tax Credit Program, permits for filming at state-owned facilities, an extensive digital location library, location assistance and a range of other production- related resources and assistance. More information is available at //www.film.ca.gov.

    Contact: Erik Deutsch, ExcelPR Group (for the California Film Commission) (323) 851-2455 direct / (310) 597-9245 cell / erikd@excelpr.com

  9. Wig and Makeup Tech

    Wig and makeup technician – South Coast Repertory is accepting resumes for a staff Wig and Makeup Technician for the 2015-2016 season.  The Wig & Makeup Technician’s primary responsibility is to act as run crew.  Other responsibilities include assisting the Wig and Makeup Supervisor in creating hairpieces and specialty makeups for all productions, show maintenance, inventory and maintenance of departmental equipment and stock, and occasional support of the wardrobe department when shows do not involve complex hair or makeup.  Requirements include previous experience in a theatrical setting, proven competence creating and maintaining wigs and hairpieces, a solid knowledge of theatrical makeup techniques, a positive attitude and strong people skills.  Previous wardrobe experience and/or hair cutting/styling skills are pluses.  Seasonal full-time contract runs mid-August to mid-June.  Benefits include vacation/sick pay, year-round medical/dental/vision and a retirement plan (403.b).  SCR values diversity in the workplace and is an Equal Opportunity Employer.  Send a cover letter, resume, references and samples of previous work to Michele Jones Production Office Manager:  email Michele@scr.org, or mail to her attention c/o South Coast Repertory, P.O. Box 2197, Costa Mesa, CA 92628-2197. No phone calls please.

  10. Wig and Makeup Tech

    Wig and makeup technician – South Coast Repertory is accepting resumes for a staff Wig and Makeup Technician for the 2015-2016 season.  The Wig & Makeup Technician’s primary responsibility is to act as run crew.  Other responsibilities include assisting the Wig and Makeup Supervisor in creating hairpieces and specialty makeups for all productions, show maintenance, inventory and maintenance of departmental equipment and stock, and occasional support of the wardrobe department when shows do not involve complex hair or makeup.  Requirements include previous experience in a theatrical setting, proven competence creating and maintaining wigs and hairpieces, a solid knowledge of theatrical makeup techniques, a positive attitude and strong people skills.  Previous wardrobe experience and/or hair cutting/styling skills are pluses.  Seasonal full-time contract runs mid-August to mid-June.  Benefits include vacation/sick pay, year-round medical/dental/vision and a retirement plan (403.b).  SCR values diversity in the workplace and is an Equal Opportunity Employer.  Send a cover letter, resume, references and samples of previous work to Michele Jones Production Office Manager:  email Michele@scr.org, or mail to her attention c/o South Coast Repertory, P.O. Box 2197, Costa Mesa, CA 92628-2197. No phone calls please.

  11. Daytime Emmy Winners

    Our 706 winners of the 42nd Annual Creative Arts Daytime Emmy Awards are:

    Outstanding Hair Styling for a Drama Series

    “The Young and the Restless” CBS

    Head Hairstylist George Guzman

    Hairstylists Shannon Bradberry, Gwen Huyen Tran, Adriana Lucio, Regina Rodriguez

  12. Rande Harris

    Rande Harris — (1953 – 2015)

    She had a true love of theater, horses and was a giving mentor and caring friend. Rande Harris’ knowledge and expertise of wigs, make-up and costuming will be missed not only by her brothers and sisters of Local 706, but to the numerous “minions” she mentored and encouraged. Although she had a long history with theater, she worked as a paralegal for a number of years before returning to her true love. She started with local community groups and then began working on the hair/make-up crew at the American Musical Theater of San Jose where she met her mentors, 706 members Sharon Ridge and Robin Church. The American Ballet Theater, Ballet San Jose, Lamplighters, Balagan Theater, Santa Clara Performing Arts, San Jose Civic Light Opera, Lyric Opera, American Musical Theater , San Jose Cleveland Ballet and touring companies kept her in demand, going from production to production. Rande became a Local 706 Regional member in 2003 and became the resident Hair and Makeup Designer at the West Bay Opera and in 2008 she traveled with Ballet San Jose to China.

    (On her online website she stated) “I often think theater is like a rich cake. Unfrosted cake alone is delicious, but add icing and decoration and it becomes a party. To me, wigs and make-up are the icing on the actor’s cake. While a show can be wonderful without wigs, add them and you have something which enhances the performer’s art and the viewer’s experience. While not absolutely essential, it is interesting to me that at each level of theater — from the smallest high school performance or community theater show to the big regional and touring companies – wigs can build on the scene and step up the level of interest. It allows the actors to “put on” their characters in a much more personal way and brings out nuances that otherwise might have been missed. It helps set the scene and time period and even gives the viewer insight to the character’s personality.”

    The stage lights are a little dimmer without our sister who passed away from ALS (Lou Gehrig’s disease). She is survived by her husband Tim, daughters Sabrina and Samantha, her brothers and grandchildren. Rande passed away on January 5, 2015 but Local 706 was not notified until just recently. Donations may be made to the Forbes Norris MDA/ALS Research and Treatment Center.

  13. Below the Line Production Listing

    Dear Local 706 Members,

    Below the Line’s industry-leading Production Listings are now available to all MPEG members at the same discount level we offer to most IATSE / Teamster locals.

    Through an agreement with the Local 706 leadership, all Make-Up & Hair Stylist Guild members will receive 40% off our normal rate (normally $15 per month / $150 per year):
    $10 per month or our BEST value $100 per year.

    You’ll get all the production listings we’ve been publishing for years.

    Click here
    //www.findfilmwork.com/discount/15
    for your Guild’s discount page

    AND, don’t forget resume / credits hosting is still FREE.

    If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to email me patrick.graham@btlnews.com.

    I look forward to seeing you all on the site!

    Patrick
    Below the Line

  14. Daytime Emmy Winners

    Our 706 winners of the 42nd Annual Creative Arts Daytime Emmy Awards are:

    Outstanding Hair Styling for a Drama Series

    “The Young and the Restless” CBS

    Head Hairstylist George Guzman

    Hairstylists Shannon Bradberry, Gwen Huyen Tran, Adriana Lucio, Regina Rodriguez

  15. Rande Harris

    Rande Harris — (1953 – 2015)

    She had a true love of theater, horses and was a giving mentor and caring friend. Rande Harris’ knowledge and expertise of wigs, make-up and costuming will be missed not only by her brothers and sisters of Local 706, but to the numerous “minions” she mentored and encouraged. Although she had a long history with theater, she worked as a paralegal for a number of years before returning to her true love. She started with local community groups and then began working on the hair/make-up crew at the American Musical Theater of San Jose where she met her mentors, 706 members Sharon Ridge and Robin Church. The American Ballet Theater, Ballet San Jose, Lamplighters, Balagan Theater, Santa Clara Performing Arts, San Jose Civic Light Opera, Lyric Opera, American Musical Theater , San Jose Cleveland Ballet and touring companies kept her in demand, going from production to production. Rande became a Local 706 Regional member in 2003 and became the resident Hair and Makeup Designer at the West Bay Opera and in 2008 she traveled with Ballet San Jose to China.

    (On her online website she stated) “I often think theater is like a rich cake. Unfrosted cake alone is delicious, but add icing and decoration and it becomes a party. To me, wigs and make-up are the icing on the actor’s cake. While a show can be wonderful without wigs, add them and you have something which enhances the performer’s art and the viewer’s experience. While not absolutely essential, it is interesting to me that at each level of theater — from the smallest high school performance or community theater show to the big regional and touring companies – wigs can build on the scene and step up the level of interest. It allows the actors to “put on” their characters in a much more personal way and brings out nuances that otherwise might have been missed. It helps set the scene and time period and even gives the viewer insight to the character’s personality.”

    The stage lights are a little dimmer without our sister who passed away from ALS (Lou Gehrig’s disease). She is survived by her husband Tim, daughters Sabrina and Samantha, her brothers and grandchildren. Rande passed away on January 5, 2015 but Local 706 was not notified until just recently. Donations may be made to the Forbes Norris MDA/ALS Research and Treatment Center.